How to Know up to 2,000 feet in advance that an animal or human is on the road through infrared camera technology

A split second can make all of the difference between a close call and a tragic motorcycle wreck. Deer and other animal strikes are one of the greatest hazards on our scenic West Virginia highways posing a real threat to vehicles and people riding on motorcycles. Though less likely, every year pedestrians are also struck and killed by vehicles.

Wouldn’t it be worth the cost to have a thermal night driving system that could detect the heat of an animal or human on the road as far back as 200o feet by giving you more time to react to any live hazards up ahead?

Thermal imaging for motorcycles detects heat instead of visible light.  Detected heat sources such as deer or pedestrians appear white against cool backgrounds.  These infrared heat detection systems such as the FLIR PathfinIR II  tracks the movement of people and animals in the dark.  This technology extends your vision far beyond the reach of your headlights and also shows animal movement off the side of the road.

The Teledyne PathfindIR II is unaffected by the glare of oncoming headlights.  You can’t predict what hazards you will meet on the road, but you can detect them in time to react and avoid a tragic accident.

Similar brands of infrared night vision technology for motorycles, cars, and trucks include Clear Path Finder and Night Owl.

Hoagy Carmichael of Hoagy’s Heroes shows and explains how motorcycle infrared heat-detecting technology works

Hoagy Carmichael, the founder of Hoagy’s Heroes, has led his team of motorcycle charity riders in over 1.5 MILLION miles to raise money for children’s charities.  To date, Hoagy’s Heroes have raised over $347,977.00 in pledges for the charities they support and have traveled over 1,593,122 miles of smiles. These rides would not be possible without the magnificent support of volunteers. The all-volunteer Hoagy’s Heroes staff spend countless hours planning and organizing each ride, while dozens of event day volunteers provide essential support at the beginning and end of each ride. In the past, these event day volunteers have included veterans, staff of local motorcycle dealerships, law enforcement officers, firefighters, members of civic organizations, and spouses and friends of many participants in the rides.

Hoagy’s Heroes riders continually stress safe motorcycle riding and model state-of-the-art gear and technology to help keep riders safe on the road.

In this video, Hoagy interviews a fellow charity rider Patrick Cornell to show and explain this motorcycle’s heat-detecting technology and describe how it works using a camera and a monitor that picks up deer, dogs, and other animals before they can be seen with the motorcycle headlights.

Learn more about Hoagy’s Heroes Long Distance Charity Riders:  https://hoagysheroes.org/

by West Virginia Motorcycle Accident Lawyer Jeff Robinette